RCoA Style Guide: M

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M

 

Medical terms
See the glossary for a list of useful medical terms.

Medicolegal
One word, no hyphen.

Member/membership
Lower case, eg member of the RCoA. Remember also to refer to fellows if appropriate.

Membership refers to all fellows and members of the College.
 
Monetary values

  • use numbers for most monetary values, for example, £8,000 not £8 thousand or £8k
  • for sums of 1million or over, use £1m or £8.5m
  • do not abbreviate 'billion'; write '£7 billion'
  • in sentences, use words, not hyphens, to show a range of monetary values. For example, 'In two years, the amount of money awarded rose from £7,000 to £8,000'. When describing ranges of figures that are not part of a sentence; such as in lists or tables, you can use a dash rather than a word. For example: 5,000-6,000 or 5m-6m
  • try not to start a sentence with a number, including a monetary value, but if you do, write it out in full.

Months

  • Format as day month and year: 15 June 2017 (no commas).
  • Use hyphens to indicate date ranges: 6-10 August, etc.

Read more about dates.

More than
Preferable to over.

Mr, Ms, Mrs, Miss
In leading articles: use the appropriate honorific after first mention (unless you are writing about an artist, author, journalist, musician, sportsman or woman, criminal or dead person, who take surname only). Use Ms for women subsequently unless they have expressed a preference for Miss or Mrs.

Everywhere apart from leading articles: generally use first name and surname on first mention, and thereafter just surname. Use an honorific, however, if this strikes the wrong tone, or to identify different members of the same family.


 

Intro | A B C D E F G H I J, K, L M N, O P Q, R S T U V, W, X, Y, Z 

Quick reference guide

Abbreviations and acronyms

Glossary