RCoA Style Guide: V, W, X, Y, Z

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Quick reference guide

Abbreviations and acronyms

Glossary


V, W, X, Y, Z

 

Vice President
Lower case when used in a general sense, eg 'the vice presidents of several societies agree'.

With regard to RCoA vice presidents, capitalise when referring to a named individual eg Professor Ravi Mahajan, Vice President of the Royal College of Anaesthetists.

Remember, the general rule is only to capitalise when necessary. 

Web, website, world wide web
The RCoA has a website but an individual news item can be found on a web page. 

While
Not 'whilst'.

Who, whom

The confusion between who and whom is one of the most common problems writers face.

Who is used as the subject of a verb or complement of a linking verb. It is a nominative pronoun – so for example, ‘it was Carl who broke all the pencils in the house.’

Whom is used as the object of the verb or the object of a preposition. It is an objective pronoun. So we say ‘you asked whom to the dance?’ In this case, the subject and verb are ‘you asked.’ The pronoun following the verb is the object of the verb, therefore whom is correct.

See The Guardian style guide for detailed guidance.

Avoid using who or whom if you are unsure. Remember: you will achieve clarity by using shorter sentences, simple words, and active rather than passive constructions. 

Wifi
One word, lower case, no hyphen.

Word document
Upper case as Word is a brand name.

Worldwide
Often redundant, eg 'the RCoA is an international College with fellows and members in 75 countries worldwide' (as opposed to galaxy-wide?).

X-ray
One hyphenated word, lower case.


Intro | A B C D E F G H I J, K, L M N, O P Q, R S T U V, W, X, Y, Z 

Quick reference guide

Abbreviations and acronyms

Glossary