Becoming a FRCA examiner

Applications to FRCA examinership

The College invites applications to the FRCA Board of Examiner Anaesthetists once a year. Examiners are recruited to Primary or Final examinations depending on the requirements of each board.

The FRCA examiner application window for academic year 2020-2021 is now closed. Applicants will receive outcome letters in March 2020. Applications for examiner recruitment for the academic year 2021-2022 will open in July 2020.

To check whether you are eligible, please read the Person Specification before submitting your application form. CVs are not required.

Further information on eligibility criteria is available in the Primary and Final FRCA selection and appointment of examiners regulations.  

Every year we recruit new examiners to one of our two boards of examiners, the Primary board and the Final board. Selection is based on eligibility, the number of examiners retiring from the boards, as well as geographical distribution, numbers from individual hospitals, sub-specialty interests, clinical and basic science examiners, representation of teaching and district general hospitals and experience.  The College does not discriminate on grounds of protected characteristics.

If your application is successful, you should expect to attend a:

  • Council ceremony in the College during June/July
  • day as an observer at either the Primary OSCE/SOE in May or the Final SOE in June
  • compulsory training day in October 
  • sim-man training course in March (Primary board only).

As an examiner you can expect to complete a term of at least six years and will be engaged to work at the College two-to-three times a year. If you are recruited to the Primary board, you will normally be required to attend two out-of-the three Primary OSCE/SOE exams. These run from Monday to Friday. Final examiners are expected to attend both SOE exams and two Constructed Response Question standard checking days. Examiners do not attend written examinations.

A full job description is available and all new examiners will be subject to a probationary period. 

Simply put, becoming an examiner has been the single most satisfying and rewarding role I’ve ever undertaken. It has involved a lot of commitment and hard work but as a result I’ve gained a huge amount of personal and professional satisfaction, and equally rewarding has been the knowledge that I’m helping the next generation of anaesthetists.

Dr Kevin O'Hare
Chair of the FRCA Final Examination