Novice Guide

Published: 13/08/2019

Getting started

Timeline and milestones

It can be very daunting starting a new job in a new specialty and working environment, so we have put together a simple step-by-step guide to help make this process as smooth as possible. Please use the menu to click through the timeline.

Before you start

Register for core training with the Royal College of Anaesthetists

Activate and configure your Lifelong Learning platform (LLp) account

Details will be sent to you by email once you have registered with the RCoA.

Further information on getting started with the Lifelong Learning platform can be found in Other Resources: Lifelong Learning platform and here

Register for access to e-Learning Anaesthesia

This is an online educational resource developed by the RCoA for anaesthetists in training.

For more information please see the section of this guide about e-Learning Anaesthesia.

Anaesthetists in training are required to keep a record of all cases they are involved with.

For more information please see the section on Logbooks in Other Resources on this guide.

Make contact with your new department

They will be able to send you information about the hospital and department induction programme which you will need to attend.

Day one

Get in early and get to know your way around.

Locate:

  • the Anaesthetic Department
  • theatres and the recovery room
  • changing rooms and lockers
  • where the weekly theatre allocations are published
  • where to find the operating lists.

As part of your departmental induction you should know who the following key people are:

  • the College Tutor
  • your Educational Supervisor
  • the rota organiser
  • the anaesthetic secretaries.

Useful tips:

  • get yourself a locker in the changing rooms to store valuables
  • arrange to get a pair of your own theatre shoes and mark them with your name
  • make sure you make a note of key access codes and phone numbers for theatres and the anaesthetic department.

Week one

By the end of week 1 you should:

  • know your way around the operating theatres
  • have pre-assessed some patients
  • be able to prepare your theatre and commonly used drugs
  • have arranged your first meeting with your educational supervisor
  • have started filling in your Logbook recording all cases you have been involved with
  • have started thinking about your LLp and the Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) you need to complete
  • have started working through the e-Learning Anaesthesia sessions for novice anaesthetists in training
  • have access to your Lifelong Learning platform (LLp) account.

Related resources

Please see the following sections:

  • curriculum/Introduction to anaesthesia
  • e-Learning Anaesthesia
  • getting started
    • preassessment
    • preparing your theatre
    • basic types of anaesthetic.

Week four

By the end of week 4 you should:

  • know your way around the theatres and the hospital
  • be proficient in assessing and consenting patients for elective surgery
  • feel confident preparing your theatre and drugs
  • have gained experience with the common types of anaesthetic for elective surgery
  • have completed some SLEs towards your Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs)
  • have uploaded a CV, recorded a PDP, and completed an SLE in the Lifelong Learning platform.

Related resources

Please see the following sections:

  • introduction/ Workplace Based Assessments
  • curriculum/IAC
  • e-Learning Anaesthesia
  • getting started
    • preassessment
    • preparing your theatre
    • basic types of anaesthetic.

Three to six months

By this stage in your training you should:

  • have completed your IAC on the Lifelong Learning platform
  • feel proficient in anaesthetising ASA I-II patients for common elective and urgent/emergency procedures
  • be starting on call duties
  • be familiar with all functions of the Lifelong Learning platform.

Related resources:

Please see the following sections:

  • curriculum
  • e-Learning Anaesthesia
  • getting started
    • On call
    • anaesthetic emergencies
  • other resources
    • AAGBI guidelines
    • resuscitation guidelines
    • Difficult Airway Society guidelines.

Six months and beyond

By now you should:

  • have completed your IAC
  • be on the on-call rota
  • have completed an appropriate number of SLEs towards a variety of stage 1 learning outcomes
  • be reviewing the stage 1 requirements in the curriculum and Lifelong Learning platform.

Beyond…

Complete:

  • Initial Assessment of Competence in Obstetric Anaesthesia (IACOA), comprised of EPAs 3 and 4
  • Advanced Life Support course +/- ATLS/APLS
  • Primary FRCA Exam
  • stage 1 training and be issued with the Stage 1 Certificate.

Consider:

  • applying for an ST4 post.